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Cross-LAK 2017: 2nd International Workshop on Learning Analytics Across Physical and Digital Spaces

*Call for Papers*

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http://crosslak.utscic.edu.au/
#crosslak17

In conjunction with LAK 2017 at Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, Canada | March 13-17, 2017 http://lak17.solaresearch.org/

Important Dates

Submission Deadline: Jan. 10, 2017
Notification to Authors: Feb 10, 2017
Camera-Ready Papers: March 1, 2017
Workshop: April 13 or 14, 2017

Workshop Theme

Student’s learning happens where the learner is rather than being constrained to a single physical or digital environment. Educational research has revealed the pedagogical benefits of letting students experience different types of content, “real world” challenges, and physical and social interactions with educators or other learners. Students commonly work outside the boundaries of the institutional learning system(s). They may interact face-to-face, use other educational tools or even use tools that were not specifically designed to serve in learning contexts. Teachers may want students to use not only the tools offered by the institution, but also other tools that are more suitable to the context and subject matter.

Pervasive and mobile technologies can be used to allow learners to get remote access to educational resources from different physical spaces (e.g. ubiquitous/mobile learning support) or to enrich their learning experiences in the classroom in ways that were not previously possible (e.g. face-to-face/blended learning support). This is creating new possibilities for learning analytics to provide continued support or a more holistic view about learning, moving beyond desktop-based learning resources. An overarching concern is how to integrate analytics across these different spaces and tools in a coordinated way. In short, there is an increasing interest in providing support for students’ learning across physical and digital spaces, and the means to achieve this are more readily available.

We invite invite contributions to the Workshop on Learning Analytics Across Physical and Digital Spaces Research. Contributions should relate to the design and study of learning analytics innovations and solutions, including but not limited to any of the following themes:

    >>>Support Across Multiple Digital Spaces: Studies of novel analytics approaches and systems that span across multiple digital learning tools (including mining, modelling or visualising datasets that integrate logs from multiple learning tools);

    >>>Bridging the Physical and Digital Realms: Design and study of learning situations that include collocated settings and/or the use of online (remote access) tools  (e.g. including ‘everyday’ settings, collocated collaboration situations, multi-device ecologies or blended learning cases);

    >>>Data Integration of Heterogeneous Learning Data Sources: Discussion of methodologies and theoretical approaches, and their technical solutions, to integrate learning activity logs from multiple sources of learner’s data (including technical but also non-technical issues such as ethics, orchestration or data management).

 

Submissions; we welcome papers under two categories:

    >>>Short papers (5 pages). Short papers consist of authors describing their research in the area of learning analytics across physical and digital spaces, aligned to at least one of the four themes of the workshop. Authors of successful submissions will give a brief firehose presentation and present a poster at the poster session during the workshop.

    >>>Position papers (2-5 pages). Position papers explain a unique perspective on the field that the author would like to contribute, aligned to one or all the themes of the workshop. Authors of successful submissions will participate in one of panel to be held during the workshop.

Participation Requirements: All workshop participants are encouraged to submit at least one paper under any of these two categories. There is no restriction on the number of papers submitted by the same author. The submission of a paper is not compulsory.

Formatting: Contributions must be submitted through the EasyChair submission system. Please use the formatting instructions and the template provided in the workshop website.

 

The expected outcomes of the workshop are the following:  

    >>>Consolidating the Cross-LAK Community. This workshop will build on the design space and guidelines formulated in the first edition of Cross-LAK [8] in order to consolidate the synergy between researchers and propose further steps as a community.

    >>>Provide a forum to ignite collaboration. The workshop will bring together the sub-communities within the learning sciences, educational technology, and LAK with the goal of contributing with their expertise in identifying the major issues to be tackled in the area, generating new ideas for future research and sparking on each other in ways that can lead to future collaboration within the LAK community.

    >>>Work towards a special issue on Cross-LAK themes. Proceedings of research papers which will be produced and selected papers will be invited to be submitted in full to a special issue (SI) on Cross-LAK in an indexed journal so other members of the LAK community can benefit and further contribute to the design space.

Organising Committee

Roberto Martinez-Maldonado (University of Technology Sydney, Australia)
Davinia Hernandez-Leo (Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Spain)
Abelardo Pardo (The University of Sydney, Australia)
Hiroaki Ogata (Kyushu University, Japan)

If you have any further questions, we encourage you to contact the organisers at <roberto.martinez-maldonado [at] uts.edu.au, davinia.hernandez [at] upf.edu>.

 

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We could have called it the “Learning Analytics Research Week” at DTIC. It was my pleasure to host several activities around learning analytics research last week. 

Dr. Roberto Martínez-Maldonado from the Connected Intelligence Centre (CIC) at the University of Technology, Sydney (UTS) has been the first visiting academic with an Erasmus+ International Mobility Grant (Erasmus+ KA107) at UPF. Within the activities of his visit, he instructed seminars devoted to PhD students. They included a hands-on workshop on multidimensional activity data visualization. The workshop engaged participants in crafting participatory data stories through the development of rapid low fidelity prototypes of collaborative work data. The workshop briefly introduced a series of concepts (such as multimodal data visualisation, learning analytics, HCI interaction data capture and visual metaphors). Then, the workshop focused on analysing a multi-user, multi-modal dataset that imposes particular challenges for visualisation design. The purpose for the attendees was to generate out-of-the-box ideas for visualising this particular Learning Analytics dataset, aimed at telling a story about collaborative group processes.

roberto_martinez-maldonado_DTIC-UPFRoberto Martínez-Maldonado also gave a DTIC Research Seminar titled “Multi-modal sequence mining and analytics of face-to-face collaborative learning”, where he introduced his work aimed at analysing aspects of students’ activity when learning collaboratively using digital ecologies enriched with sensors for identifying users, and also at multi-display settings. This strand of research is seeking out to automatically distinguish, discover and distil salient common patterns of interaction within groups, by mining the logs of students’ actions, detected speech, changes in group’s artefacts, etc. The talk showcased a number of group situations where multiple people are engaged in creative tasks that require design thinking and sense making. Multiple data mining techniques have been used in these scenarios to generate understanding of collaborative group processes including: classification, sequence pattern mining, process mining and clustering techniques.

abelardo-pardo_DTIC_UPF.pngDr. Abelardo Pardo, Senior Lecturer at the School of Electrical and Information Engineering, The University of Sydney, also visited the DTIC last week. He gave a DTIC Research Seminar with the title “Feedback at scale with a little help from my algorithms”. In his talk, Abelardo Pardo explained that despite the importance of formative feedback to improve educational experiences, providing adequate feedback in the right form, at the right time, at the right level is still challenging and risky. Academics in higher education institutions are increasingly under pressure to solve the tension between larger student cohorts in active learning scenarios and the quality of feedback given to students. The increasing amount of tasks that are mediated by technology offers the possibility to obtain a detailed digital footprint of the students. The talk explored some ideas about how to combine educational technology, data collection and prediction algorithms with current tasks carried out by instructors to amplify their effect in active learning scenarios.

These activities are connected with the strategic research program on Data Science associated to the Maria de Maetzu” distinction awarded to the DTIC. Learning Analytics research partly funded by this program was also presented at the 6th International Learning Analytics & Knowledge Conference (LAK’16) recently held in Edinburgh.

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